Shakespeare, Long Division, and School Dances: A Global Crisis

By Susannah Hutcheson, Regular ContributorNovember 16, 2015

content_chair.jpg

image via pinterest.com

I grew up in a little town outside of Dallas, Texas- where there was nothing more exciting than the day the parachute was brought in to the gym for recess, and there was nothing more eye-roll inducing than another analytical essay of Moby Dick.

I played Red Rover on the playground and searched for treasure underneath the swing sets.

I practiced my handwriting in bright purple workbooks, and I passed notes around the room- decorated in pink pen and folded in a million directions.

I learned how to open my locker- 3 to the right, 2 to the left, 1 to the right- and I decorated it with pictures and mirrors and stickers.

I watched “The Video,” giggling with my friends when they passed out pads to the girls, and I sang in choir concerts and (badly) played my violin.

I took awkward pictures at school dances and spent many a Friday nights at football games.

I read Julius Caesar and Moby Dick, but I also read Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret and Matilda.

I was able to learn about galaxies, polar bears, sentence structure, and long division.

I was able to learn the importance of kindness, hard work, and respecting myself, respecting my intelligence, and respecting those around me.

I was told that I could be who ever I wanted, and I was given all the tools to sprint towards my dreams with full force.  

In an article for Medium, actress, activist, and overall badass, Sophia Bush, wrote about “The Story of One Girl.” She writes about the girl with gifts and dreams and wonder, the girl who isn’t getting to learn about multiplication and adverbs.

Instead, she is a girl sewing cheap material in a factory.

She is a girl confused and feeling alone with no semblance of a curfew or a bedtime.

She is a girl terrified to walk to school for fear of being shot.

She is a girl with a family who needs her to support them financially.

She is a girl who has been raised without the idea of school and without the means to get to one if there is one nearby.

There are fifty million of her.

Today, at this moment, fifty million girls aren’t in school. They aren’t getting to put on their backpacks, complain about their homework, or learn about the mysterious mechanics of the ground beneath them.

Why is this being accepted? Why aren’t we hearing a global outcry about this? It’s an absolute abomination and a global issue. Everyone deserves the chance to sharpen their pencils and get the same opportunities as the girl just down the street or the one 10,000 miles around the world.

Let’s do something about it. Thanks, Sophia.

Let's chat!

How can we spread awareness about the lack of education for these girls? Tell us below!


About Susannah

SUSANNAH_HUTCHESON_writer_bio.jpgSusannah is a Journalism major, passionate about social justice and Jesus Christ. She loves cold weather, triple-shot lattes, and macaroni and cheese. When she’s not writing papers or baking cookies, you can find her Googling random things on the Internet or watching large amounts of reality television. You can read her ramblings at ileftamessinthekitchen.wordpress.com, or look at pictures of her coffee on Instagram: @susannah.beth.

 

Every girl is a work in progress. If you need more help, click here.

 

Showing 3 reactions

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.
  • commented 2015-11-16 11:59:52 -0800
    hi, I think we should spread the word, in the part below this would change peoples ideas about children school work,
    " In an article for Medium, actress, activist, and overall badass, Sophia Bush, wrote about “The Story of One Girl.” She writes about the girl with gifts and dreams and wonder, the girl who isn’t getting to learn about multiplication and adverbs.

    Instead, she is a girl sewing cheap material in a factory.

    She is a girl confused and feeling alone with no semblance of a curfew or a bedtime.
    She is a girl terrified to walk to school for fear of being shot.
    She is a girl with a family who needs her to support them financially.
    She is a girl who has been raised without the idea of school and without the means to get to one if there is one nearby."
    I hope you have enough time to massage back soon thanks lots Sarah.
  • followed this page 2015-11-16 11:55:11 -0800
  • followed this page 2015-11-15 15:03:14 -0800

Connect With Us

  • FOLLOW @IAMTHATGIRL