Edna Adan, a Global Force for Good

By Rachel Benbrook Mason, Regular ContributorOctober 11, 2015

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image via wikipedia.com

As we strive towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals, a set of global goals with specific targets for improving the quality of life of people all around the world, we can see the impact that women are having towards a better global society. One particularly inspiring woman, Edna Adan, is doing her part to improve women’s health care in the autonomous African region of Somaliland. Located on the east coast of Africa, the region has seen its fair share of diplomatic troubles, and many women have bore the brunt of the chaos that can come with political instability.

Many women have not had adequate access to healthcare, therefore the regions birth statistics measure around 85 infant deaths per every 1,000 births. Additionally, many women are forced (or due to societal pressures may choose to undergo) the painful and damaging practice of female genital mutilation. This practice involves women having their private parts cut as a cleansing and coming of age ritual. The practice can leave women damaged for life, as well as even lead to death in extreme cases.

Edna Adan saw these statistics, and she knew she had to make a difference.

She came from an affluent family in Somalia and was trained to be a nurse in the United Kingdom. She then went on to marry a man who became Prime Minister of Somalia and later the President of Somaliland.

She put her skills and her knowledge to good use, and out of her own pension, she created a women’s hospital. She fights tirelessly to give women in Somaliland the access to the healthcare that they need, and as a result, the infant mortality rate has significantly lessened. Edna’s hospital is also in the process of training women to go into the field of midwifery, so they can help assist women in childbirth, and reduce the rates of infant mortality and maternal mortality.

It is women like Edna who prove that one person truly can make a difference.

She is using her education and her resources to help women in her home country, and she has raised a tremendous amount of awareness for the global cause of women’s health.

I cannot wait to continue to see how women like Edna help move our world forward into a better place.

Let's chat!

How can we follow Edna's lead and help those with poor healthcare access? What other women are helping make society a better place by helping others? Tell us below!


About Rachel

RACHEL_BENBROOK_writer_bio_(2).jpgRachel is a graduate of Oklahoma State University and the University of Leeds where she studied Political Communications. She is a passionate advocate of strong friendships, caffeine, social justice, current events, travels and adventures, as well as all things peanut butter. She enjoys watching Parks and Recreation, as well as teaching English to new language learners. 

 

Every girl is a work in progress. If you need more help, click here.

 

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