All About That Bass & The Message it Really Sends

By Dana Zillgitt, Regular Contributor

By no means am I a Meghan Trainor fan by any stretch of the imagination. But I give credit where it’s deserved—her songs are way too easy to get stuck in your head. But by no means are they worth it. Recently, she won a Billboard Music Award for her song “All About That Bass”. 

I was bobbing my head along to the beat in my car when I paused a moment at the lyric, “forget the skinny bitches,” or something like that. I wanted to know what qualified one as a skinny bitch. So naturally, I went to Wikipedia and looked up the rest of the lyrics. Next question was “You’re bringing booty back. Hasn’t it already been brought back already?” And how is that honour bestowed upon someone? And while the song is catchy, which is why she won the award in the first place, I’m still struggling with the lyrics.


Since when did we trade substance in lyrics for a hook on the radio? I’m sure Trainor is not the first person to bring booty back nor will she be the last. And I’m pretty positive she wasn’t the first one who had a mother to tell her boys like a little “bit more” as well. But all that aside, since when was it okay to put one body type on a pedestal while stepping on another? And how is this any different from fat shaming? Embracing your body shape is great, but not if it comes at the cost of slamming another.

Additionally, when is it alright to cultivate this message to the masses that the way our bodies appear is the only thing worthwhile about ourselves? Or that we exist only for the gender we’re attracted to? Nonsense.  As apparent as it is, I have a lot of trouble with this song and the kind of message it may present.  On a thin layer, Trainer is promoting the self-love, body positivity message we’ve all been looking for…. as well as that’s what keeps the boys coming to the yard. Dig a little deeper though, and it seems like she’s a contradiction all the way through; that the reflection in the mirror is nothing more than a way you’ll be judged on less than merit. Now that the rant is over, Trainor did have quite a few catchy songs this year that get stuck in your head easier than we may care to admit. And it’s hard not to sing along at the top of our lungs but at the same time we need to make sure we are promoting self-love, self-worth, and the acceptance of all body types, without shaming another.

Let's chat! What do you think about Meghan Trainor's song? How has the music industry changed society's opinion of value and beauty? Tell us about it here!

About Dana

DANA_ZILLGITT.jpgDana has her BA in International Affairs & Spanish as well as a mild obsession with rescue animals and all things caffeinated. She’s mastered the art of the selfie, fort building, and even the sass battle. Plus, she can quote 95% of Anchorman and Zoolander.



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  • commented 2015-05-29 00:14:23 -0700
    Hi Dana, I agree with you than we cannot criticise one body shame to make other more legit. I also agree that we should not be seeking men’s opinion on what is an acceptable body type . I am a single plus size woman who is often called fat, big, plum. Giant etc etc.
    In the discourse that all sizes are beautiful the plus size often gets left out.
    Megan’s song actually made me good. Probably the first time it seemed plus size can be sexy too.

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